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'Cajun Pawn Stars': $35,000 Disappointment (AOL TV Squad) — It was almost a great day for one pawn shop regular on the latest episode of "Cajun Pawn Stars" (Wed., 9 p.m. ET on History). He thought he'd stumbled on a jackpot when he brought in an Indian head gold coin. The appraiser at first gave him a staggering estimate valuing the coin at $35,000. But alas, upon further examination, he discovered in tiny print on the coin the word "Copy." That was the last thing he wanted to see, because he now had to explain to his loyal customer that the $35,000 number he'd just thrown out was overselling the value of the piece ... by a lot! When the customer asked what it meant that the coin had "Copy" engraved on it, the pawn shop worker told him, "I'll tell you what; I'll trade you a soda for it." The customer took it in stride, cracking a joke about his luck that was more charming and colloquial than logical and making any sense whatsoever. "When it comes to luck, I might as well be poopin' with the polecats," he said. See more characters and finds every Wednesday at 9 p.m. with the "Cajun Pawn Stars" on History. TV Replay scours the vast television landscape to find the most interesting, amusing, and, on a good day, amazing moments, and delivers them right to your browser.
'Pawn Stars': Signed Copy Of Charles Lindbergh's Autobiography (AOL TV Squad) — The "Pawn Stars" (Mon., 10 p.m. ET on History) got their hands on a signed copy of aviator Charles Lindbergh's autobiography Monday night. Rather rashly, Chumlee Russell bought the copy of "WE" for $500 without first checking that the autograph was real. Fortunately for Chumlee, this time his instincts paid off — after an expert authenticated the autograph he was able to resell the book for a cool $1,500. Check out Rick Harrison reliving the time he was duped by a forged autograph. The bargain-hunting continues each week on "Pawn Stars," Mondays at 10 p.m. ET on History. TV Replay scours the vast television landscape to find the most interesting, amusing, and amazing moments — and delivers them right to your browser.
A Landmark Week for Cable: How History Beat The Broadcast Networks (TV Guide) — History's record-breaking "Hatfields & McCoys" made headlines last week, but gone mostly unnoticed in the shuffle was news of something even more ground-breaking for the entire TV industry: For the week ending June 3, History ranked as the No. 1 network among total viewers.
Strictly biz (NY Post) — Suddenly, entrepreneurs are TV's new Idols. As singing competitions shed viewers, a new breed of reality show is striking it rich. "Coming out of the recession, people like to see other people beating the system and living the American dream," says Brent Montgomery, producer of "Pawn Stars" and ABC ...
'Ball Boys' vs. 'Pawn Stars': 'They do the same thing, only they are not as good as me' (Zap2It: Inside the Box) — To generations of moms, baseball cards, helmets and bats are regarded as clutter. So what if some athlete took a pen to them? The stuff often winds up in the trash. But sports memorabilia is a major business, and like any objects of value, their provenance is interesting. Those stories are featured in ABC's "Ball Boys," a half-hour reality show launching Saturday, March 24. It revolves around Robbie's First Base, a store in Baltimore. Owner Robbie Davis Sr., a former car salesman, opened the shop 23 years ago. His son, Robbie Jr., works with him, as do Sweet Lou and Shaggy. Though Davis says Sweet Lou knows his sports facts, in the pilot he's presented as a dolt. If this sounds like a very close copy of "Pawn Stars" with the father, son and dopey pal, Chumlee, it should. The same producers are behind both shows. Davis saw the History hit for the first time three weeks before the ...
History Channel's 'Vikings' Is First Scripted Series (The Wrap) — History Channel has the second most popular reality series on cable TV with "Pawn Stars," and now the network is tackling its first scripted series with "Vikings." The network announced the series, from MGM Studios, will begin production for a 2013 debut. ...
Reyne Haines: Celebrity Collector: Rick Dale (AOL TV Squad) — Would you ever think being an antique restorer could land you and your business in front of millions of television viewers each week? I'm sure when Rick Dale of American Restoration began fixing up things as a business; he never considered his face would become a household name. What started as a small role on the popular television series Pawn Stars would eventually spin off to his own reality series, well ... Dale had to wonder ... how did I get here? Now one of History Channels hit series on collecting, his restoration business is booming! Dale was kind enough to take a break from beautifying things to tell me more about his passion for restoring Americana items and to give me a little sneak preview of an upcoming show ... RH: I'm curious, were you a collector or a restorer first? DALE: I started as a restorer. I got my start in 1983 doing excavation business. The economy was not doing very well and I had to make a living. I had an old Coke machine in the backyard. I restored it and took it somewhere to sell. I learned the Japanese were buying. I sold it immediately. It was explained to me that Americana was a hot thing overseas. I started running around buying these items to restore and resell. Over the years I was able to develop relationships with American buyers as well. It was just a business in the beginning. RH: Coca Cola items are popular worldwide. It's no wonder they are reproduced. You find them at flea markets, antique shops, garage sales ... do you have any tips for new collectors on spotting fakes? DALE: It is a huge problem. I only restore authentic items. Learning the differences between new and old has taken time. Now the manufacturers are forced to mark the products somewhere, even if it's just a small mark. If you look very carefully and you'll find it. Do your research before you make a spontaneous buy. The longer you spend time handling these items, the easier you can identify reproductions. Interestingly enough, many of the reproductions that came out in the 1990s are now collectible! RH: Can you recommend any good reference books or websites for new Coke collectors? DALE: There is a collecting association called Coca Cola Collectors of America. I recommend that anyone interested in Coke items join that club. Their members have a plethora of knowledge. They can be very helpful not just to beginning collectors but seasoned ones too. RH: What are your thoughts on buying Coke items that have some wear? For example, there are a lot of metal signs, holders, etc that have some rust or enamel loss. Should collectors buy these? DALE: There are certain things you do and don't do. For example; signs. They came in porcelain, painted and wood. Many items have little value after being restored. Common items that have chips and dings in the porcelain are not worth restoring. I try to be honest and tell people when to leave things as is. Things that have sentimental value are worth restoring. If restoring just for resale, you have to take into consideration the restoration cost, plus the cost you have into the item — vs. the value of the item. Restoring something because it's a family item can make it priceless. RH: How did you become interested in collecting gas pumps? Such a Mantique! DALE: In the beginning I only sold Coke machines. I realized I needed to sell more than just one item. I kept hearing people talk about their "man caves." For example, men collect cars, and they wanted to expand to car memorabilia to go with their car collections in the "man cave." That's where gas pumps came into play. RH: I love watching the interesting things you restore on the show. Anything unusual you can tell us about in an upcoming show? DALE: I had a coup de grace moment recently. One of my restoration projects was placed in the Petersen Automotive Museum. Museums are a big thing for me. They need grants to be built. They are struggling to keep things and also to preserve them. They certainly have my compassion. If I can get something placed in a museum to be seen by the world, it's a big deal! Check out the "Speeder" that is coming up in the show in about a month. It's a car of sorts that was driven around to inspect the railroad track. A gentleman brought it to us for repair. They are 100 years-old and HUGE! It took four guys to lift a single wheel. I am not used to dealing with things of this size. It has hundreds of moving parts. It was quite the undertaking. I think you'll enjoy the episode! Thanks Rick! I look forward to seeing it, and more tips you pass along on future episodes. Catch "American Restoration," Wednesday nights @ 10 p.m. on HISTORY.
"Pawn Stars's" Rick Harrison Is Engaged (People) — The reality star popped the question to Deanna Burditt on Valentine's Day.
L ve and 'Pawn' (NY Post) — Memo to frenzied Valentine's Day shoppers try your local pawn shop. Thanks to the success of truTV's "Hardcore Pawn" and History's "Pawn Stars," pawn shops, once considered low-rent, have become de rigeur among savvy shoppers looking to save money without sacrificing quality. And with Valentine's Day ...
Clerks and Comic Superheroes Collide in Kevin Smith's Comic Book Men (TV Guide) — It took 41 years, but Kevin Smith is finally proving his parents wrong. "They always said, 'Your friends are idiots. You can't sit around and goof off with your friends.' I was like, 'Yeah we can,'" Smith tells TVGuide.com of his new AMC reality series, "Comic Book Men," starring his childhood friends-turned-comic book store employees Bryan Johnson, Walt Flanagan, Mike Zapcic and Ming Chen. "Comic Book Men" (Sunday, 10/9c) is best described as "Pawn Stars" plus "Clerks" multiplied by comic books: one part docu-series about the crazy clerks, quirky customers and collectibles at Smith's Jay and Silent Bob's Secret Stash comic book store in Red Bank, N.J., and one part talk show, where the guys gather together — no confessional needed — to discuss the ...
Lance Bass On His New Reality Show, 'Famous Yard Sale' (AOL TV Squad) — Lance Bass has sung in the boy-band 'N Sync and dabbled in space-travel. Now he's trying to reinvent himself as a reality show producer. Bass stopped by "Good Day NY" (weekdays, 7 a.m. EST on Fox) on Thursday to talk about his latest project, "Famous Yard Sale." Bass explained the premise of the show to Rosanna Scotto. "It's where celebrities throw yard sales and spring-clean their houses, and raise money for their personal charities," he said. Bass reported that he just returned from the the Realscreen Summit in Washington, D.C., a conference where reality show writers and producers pitch TV networks on their new projects. He did not say whether he was able to find a network or broadcast home for the show. Liz Gateley, the chief of DiGa, the production company Bass has partnered with for "Famous Yard Sale," recently described the show to The Hollywood Reporter as, "A little bit of [MTV’s] Cribs, a little bit of the Barbara Walters aspect where the celebrity is walking down memory lane, and a little bit of Pawn Stars." Bass' last project was a boy-band reality show that he reportedly sold to VH1 in June of 2011. TV Replay scours the vast television landscape to find the most interesting, amusing, and, on a good day, amazing moments, and delivers them right to your browser.
PBS's competition reality series Market Wars: antiques dealers compete for 'bragging rights' (Reality Blurred) — This summer and fall, PBS will air Market Wars, a 20-episode competition series during which four antiques dealers complete to find antiques and get the most money for them at an auction that will conclude each hour-long episode. While PBS has aired Antiques Roadshow since 1997, and this new series comes from its producers, it seems like a clear response to the popularity of cable series such as Pawn Stars and Storage Wars. On the ...
'Pawn Stars': Rick's Bad News About A Purchase (AOL TV Squad) — The guys of "Pawn Stars" (Mon., 10 p.m. EST on History) are good, but they're not perfect. Though in hindsight, the Old Man always seems to become that way. He was on hand again this time to tell his son and co-owner RIck Harrison that he knew better. Of course he did. Rick got excited about a purported 19th century strongbox, and so he bought it before he brought in his expert to appraise it. Normally, Rick has a good eye for what's fake and what's real, but the attention to detail and quality of the piece must have blinded him. It was a fake. "I thought it was fake to start with," the Old Man told him. When Rick challenged him, asking him why then he'd let him spend the store's money on it, the Old Man replied, "I didn't want to bust your bubble." He followed it up with, "Now I can holler at you." See what treasures and trash the guys discover on "Pawn Stars" every Monday night at 10 p.m. EST on History. TV Replay scours the vast television landscape to find the most interesting, amusing, and, on a good day, amazing moments, and delivers them right to your browser.
Fox's American Country New Year's Eve Live to Include Toby Keith, Joe Nichols and Eli Young Band (Cinema Blend) — Joining Atkins and Alaina for the evening are country juggernaut Toby Keith, Joe Nichols, and the increasingly popular Eli Young Band, who made it big more recently with their first #1 hit, "Crazy Girl." The lengthily titled "American Country New Year's Eve Live" will air out of Las Vegas at the Mandalay Bay resort. The Las Vegas "Pawn Stars" guys, Rick Harrison and Chumlee Russell will host the country-themed program alongside comedian Rodney Carrington.
Evan Shapiro: TV: The Great Uniter? (AOL TV Squad) — Every Friday night, my kids, my wife and I boot up the TV and watch a week's worth of our favorite shows. We don't all like everything the same. Personally, I feel like Glee has jumped the shark, and it took a while for my kids to warm to the pitch black humor of Louie. Still, we watch it all, together (usually over Thai food). It's an important time for our family in which issues arise that normally would not. Sometimes my wife and I must answer questions we'd rather not, and sometimes my kids get questions they'd rather avoid. But after a long, rushed, hectic week apart, this "TV Time" brings us closer. Unfortunately, in this digital age, this is a rarer occurrence than you might think. Once upon a time, in "the days before the 'Net," families all over America gathered together, in front of an electronic hearth, for "TV Time." Whether for Love Boat, Donny & Marie, M*A*S*H or a thing known as "The News," in this bygone era, everyone in the house simply watched the same thing, at the same time, in the same room. As many a latch-key kid knows, this time together didn't always result in actual "together-ness." Sitting in silence, in the glow of a Zenith tube does not necessarily generate empathy or understanding. Despite sharing laughs with Jack Tripper or tears with the Bradfords, many American families still disintegrated, like the Louds. (Hey kids, in case you're wondering, these references are why Wikipedia was invented.) No, "TV Time" didn't save the nuclear family structure — in fact many say it helped accelerate its demise. But togetherness wasn't what made these shared experiences so important to American Life. It was the larger conversation — and perhaps most importantly, the residual conflict generated by this collective TV watching — that made America a unique, vital and influential society. In 1972, the number one show in America was All In the Family. (Top 20 TV 1972.) The show got a 54 Share. Each time Archie and Edith sang "Those Were The Days," 54% of people watching television — one out of every three Americans — sat down to watch ... together. Other shows in the Top Twenty that year included The Flip Wilson Show (44 share), Sanford & Son (41 share) and Mary Tyler Moore (39 share). These series were tame by today's cable standards, but considered dangerous at the time, dealing with heady and difficult stuff such as race, sex, drugs, feminism and class that had itched beneath the skin of American consciousness yet had been taboos in popular culture. When the Jeffersons found out their future daughter-in-law was half white, Archie, Edith and the WHOLE country — black and white — reacted, together. For the next six days, no matter where you lived or what you did for a living, THAT'S what you talked about. When Meathead and Archie battled on Viet Nam and Free Love; when Flip Wilson and Redd Foxx tackled race and class warfare in front of HUGE and DIVERSE audiences; when Mary Tyler Moore stood her ground as an unmarried professional woman; we all watched, together, and then we debated the subject as a country until the next episode. In 1973, on PBS's An American Family, the Loud clan fell apart, in front of our collective eyes in jaw dropping fashion. It was not the pseudo-scripted 'reality' of the Kardashians, it was actual real life, right in our living rooms. Lance Loud's coming out was a jolt to the American psyche, one that reverberated for decades. It would not have been, had we not been forced to watch, as one. Back then — Black and White, Urban and Suburban — you just watched. Then you argued it out with the Meathead or Archie in your life. Often, you learned something about the other side and sometimes, you even found some common ground. Partly because of the subject matter, partluy because of the writing, but mostly because of the shared experience, "TV Time" helped America work a lot of its shit out. It may have been messy, but things did change. In 1982, the number one show, Dallas, was still pulling a 45 share. (Top 20 TV 1982.) When someone tried to kill JR Ewing — it was a shot heard 'round the world. The Top Twenty of that year was mostly fluff like Dukes of Hazzard (37 share), Joanie Loves Chachi (35 share — apparently a LOT of people loved Chachi) and The Love Boat (exciting and new at a 36 share). The networks had abandoned the risk-taking programming of a decade earlier in favor of bland mindlessness that appealed to the lowest common denominator. The large audiences were due to limited choice, not true viewer desire. By 1992, cable TV and VCRs had disrupted the collective TV experience. Roseanne and 60 Minutes attracted big audiences, but they were hardly diverse. Cosby pulled in a relatively diverse audience, but half the share of voice of All In The Family. (Top 20 TV 1992.) And, while the Huxtables put a new kind of role models on TV — the first real middle class African American family in prime time (sorry, Weezy) — it's a stretch to call the show controversial. The mainstream TV that show could create a cross-cultural collision of viewpoints had lost its place on the dial. "TV Time" has all but disappeared. According to Nielsen, from 1992 to 2006, "co-viewing" — TV watched by an entire household — fell by 22 on Cable. TV viewing had become an asymmetrical and solitary experience. Americans had gone to their respective corners, taking comfort only from stories and voices that reinforced what they already thought. Today, with few exceptions, TV shows are ghettos. OK, so American Idol draws a big and somewhat diverse audience. But with a 22 share, it's a much smaller definition of 'mass' than it's predecessors. Most of TV today appeals to only White or Black or Hispanic, Female or Male, Young or Old, Conservative or Liberal. Television has lost the power of "AND." The upside to hyper nichification? Producers no longer have to cater to the lowest common denominator, and therefore can take much greater risks. Homeland, Parks & Recreation and Louie would likely not have made it on TV in 1972, 1982 or 1992. These shows aren't meant for the Masses, and knowing that allows artists and programmers to be boldly and aggressively creative. There is considerable downside to these TV Ghettos, however. It is rare for ideas or communities to collide the way they did in the Bunker household. Few performers open eyes and minds the way Flip Wilson did. The water cooler is now less a debate than an echo-chamber. News channels preach to their choirs, without truly hoping to convert anyone. Meatheads talk to Meatheads, Archies talk to Archies and never the twains shall meet. As a result, the tenor of our cultural conversation has become increasingly bellicose — we scream our opinions at each other, void of empathy for the other point of view. Yet, there is hope. There have been recent signs of TV togetherness. In the last five years (according to Mr. Nielsen), "TV Time" is on the rise. Broadcast "co-viewing" is up 8% since 2007, and Cable "co-viewing" is up more than 12%. This does not even account for the fast growing "digital co-viewing" on the Twitter and the Facebook. Tune in to Twitter, and it's clear that "TV Time" is making a come-back, especially among the younger and plugged-in. Whether on social media or in the analog version or actual human companionship, it seems people are watching TV together again. It's unclear if this has had an effect on the national conversation, but it's conceivable that as people experience more and more TV content as a collective, they will embrace their differences. Shows like Teen Mom, Glee and Intervention draw diverse audiences and take on difficult issues. A new reality TV series called The GOP Debates has drawn record-sized audiences. While it's likely that many progressives tune in to deride the participants, social media and polling seems to demonstrate that many on both sides of the aisle have watched the first debates of their lives, because they sense the import of the issues and the need to pay attention. No, TV is not the cure for all society's ills. It is doubtful that a few episodes of Pawn Stars are going to bridge the great cultural chasms of our time. BUT, it's been proven that eating dinner together as a family is a key factor in successful parenting. And, in our house at least, our weekly "TV Time" does make a big difference. It helps us share a collective window on the world and talk about something other than ourselves. So I appeal to you, Dear Reader. In the year ahead, given the choice of watching your favorite show, alone, on your iPad, or trying something new and watching with your friends, your neighbors or even (gulp) your parents — do the unexpected. Reach out and share the experience — and perhaps a new show — with someone else. This holiday season, as you gather with your multi-generational loved ones, there's a literal smorgasbord of great TV for you to share (including marathons of Arrested Development and Portlandia on IFC — yes, a shameless plug, but c'mon I do have a real job). There's bound to be something that everyone hasn't seen, and with the amount of great stuff on TV right now, it's likely something that will spark a conversation you didn't expect to have. TV Time with Bunkers, the Sanfords and the Louds may not have saved the American family, but it did stimulate important national conversations the way that our national media should. Despite fragmentation, television remains the most powerful media on the planet. If we want to progress as a culture, Americans MUST cross the borders of cultural divide and attempt to make peace with the diversity of our society. In my humble opinion, "TV Time" is a crucial tool to re-open the lines of communication and tear down the silos we've built around ourselves. This New Year, make time for "TV Time."
Exclusive: Toby Keith, Pawn Stars Join American Country New Year's Eve Live (TV Guide) — The Eli Young Band, Toby Keith and Joe Nichols will perform during "American Country New Year's Eve Live," TVGuide.com has learned exclusively. In addition, comedian and country music singer ...
History Channel's Pawn Stars, reality TV make it the fifth-most popular cable channel (Reality Blurred) — The History Channel's reality shows have propelled the network to become the fifth-most popular network on cable, behind only USA, Disney, TNT, and ESPN; last year, it was number eight. Pawn Stars, which is getting a spin-off, is largely responsible for that growth. While the network is planning to air some scripted shows, its brand of reality TV — including Top Shot — has now made it more popular than any other network that airs primarily unscripted TV. The ...
'Pawn Stars' Begets 'Cajun Pawn Stars' Spin-off on History Channel (Video) (The Wrap) — Been wondering where you can hock that spare cow you have sitting around? Look no further than the Silver Dollar Pawn & Jewelry Center in Alexandria, La., the setting for the History Channel's spin-off of its most popular series, "Pawn Stars." "Cajun Pawn Stars," which premieres on History on Jan. 8, will revolve around Silver Dollar Pawn, a shop that, in addition to dealing in jewelry and collectibles, also trades in livestock. ...
Man-tique's all-stars (NY Post) — Rick Harrison, "Pawn Stars": Runs the Gold & Silver pawn shop in Vegas with father and son Ton Jones and Allen Haff, "Auction Hunters": Two friends travel the nation bidding for the contents of abandoned storage sheds, to sell for big bucks Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz, "American Pickers": Partners and ...
'Pawn Stars' looks for NBA strikers (NY Post) — Attention idle NBA stars: "Pawn Stars" chief Rick Harrison wants you to come work for him. With the NBA lockout threatening to wipe out the entire season, Harrison hopes to hire an out-of-work pro hoopster to work in the show's Gold & Silver Pawn Shop in Las Vegas. "The Harrisons ...
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